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Marisa Erven - WIP Thread
MarisaErven
#21 Posted : Friday, April 15, 2011 8:57:26 PM(UTC)
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Hey Horia - Thanks for the feedback and paintover :)

Pointing out the opacity settings completely helped. It was dulling my contrast/value separations, even though I sampled throughout the whole page from those swatches.
I'll continue to sharpen up the value separation for my silhouettes for the future and work on revising #8 in the meanwhile.

M

MarisaErven
#22 Posted : Tuesday, April 19, 2011 10:56:06 PM(UTC)
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Here's a pass for enviro thumbs.  Will approach more variations Thursday evening.  Please let me know any suggestions :)  Thanks! 

 

MarisaErven
#23 Posted : Thursday, April 21, 2011 9:18:14 PM(UTC)
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More enviro stuff!  Really enjoying this process.

 

Edwin Rhemrev
#24 Posted : Friday, April 22, 2011 1:39:32 PM(UTC)
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Nice stuff sofar marisa, really love that last batch of thumbnails! Maybe put in a silhouet of a traveler or hiker to give some scale to your environments? Oh, and using an overlay-layer to put in some sunlight here and there to break up the graphic nature of these thumbs might also be an idea. Very cool stuff sofar, can't wait to get started myself:)
David Morgado
#25 Posted : Saturday, April 23, 2011 7:31:15 AM(UTC)
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Hey Marisa! These thumbs just show that when you are "free" from technique, you manage to produce wonderful compositions, which I can only envy! This is a good starting niche for your future work in my opinion :)
MarisaErven
#26 Posted : Saturday, April 23, 2011 5:21:06 PM(UTC)
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Colorize wip.  Mostly worked on mid right area to define feel and will spread out to the rest.  :)  Ideas and suggestions always welcome~!

MarisaErven
#27 Posted : Saturday, April 23, 2011 5:23:33 PM(UTC)
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Edwin Rhemrev wrote:
Nice stuff sofar marisa, really love that last batch of thumbnails! Maybe put in a silhouet of a traveler or hiker to give some scale to your environments? Oh, and using an overlay-layer to put in some sunlight here and there to break up the graphic nature of these thumbs might also be an idea. Very cool stuff sofar, can't wait to get started myself:)

 

Thank you~!  The overlay and character are great suggesions.  I'll be sure to add those :)  Can't wait to see yours!  All your work is very expressive that I've seen posted, looking forward to what you can do with the style.

MarisaErven
#28 Posted : Saturday, April 23, 2011 5:26:06 PM(UTC)
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David Morgado wrote:
Hey Marisa! These thumbs just show that when you are "free" from technique, you manage to produce wonderful compositions, which I can only envy! This is a good starting niche for your future work in my opinion :)

 

Thanks David~!  I've really enjoyed working this way thus far and look forward to incorporating it as I go forward.  I appreciate your insight!  Glad you liked them :)

Daniel (Yoh) Oliver
#29 Posted : Sunday, April 24, 2011 2:18:48 PM(UTC)
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Nice enviroments Marisa, you've really taken to the custom shape tool like a duck to water.
I've yet to really intergrate it into my own art..... enviromental work always goes right over my head.

But that being said your work is giving me ideas as to how to tackle my own, so thanks for that.

~Yoh
Thomas Scholes
#30 Posted : Sunday, April 24, 2011 6:53:24 PM(UTC)
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Marisa: Really fun stuff, I'm pleased to see you've kept your value range simple and orderly. There are a few with too much texture (one of the pitfalls of it being so easy to apply texture with custom shapes) but others have a rather nice balance. Really fond of the one with the fountain (birdbath?). I'd like to see some more thumbnails, keep your values simple but see if you can't work in another shade or two to really push the depth. (Think maybe, a darker shade for extreme foreground!) I know you're probably eager to start painting in full color, and please do experiment with whatever motivates you the most - but as you do paint in color, make note of what issues you have and try to problem solve as you go along. Use these notes to send you on the path to your next study and perhaps things to solve in the initial (or thumbnail) stage of your process. I'm looking forward to seeing more! Let me know if you have any questions!
MarisaErven
#31 Posted : Tuesday, April 26, 2011 9:50:56 PM(UTC)
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@ Thomas, thank you for all of your feedback and technique sharing. I will certainly keep the value/depth cues in mind. I'm really looking forward to working with thumbs in this style in the future. :)

@ Yoh, Thank you :) I look forward to seeing more of your work over the upcoming weeks! Best wishes!
David Morgado
#32 Posted : Wednesday, April 27, 2011 12:51:57 PM(UTC)
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Hi Marisa

Try to keep some of the hard edges of the original thumbnail as you are refining it. On this last update, the edges are all very "blurry". The ideal is to have edge variety (hard egdes vs soft edges, and various levels in between). But if you don't want to add edge variety, then hard edges are the way to go, because the image reads well that way.

Hope that helps
MarisaErven
#33 Posted : Wednesday, April 27, 2011 9:42:51 PM(UTC)
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Round One of the book cover...found prep for this certainly took equal to creating the piece.  :)  Reference in particular was Sargent, particularly for negative space use and bold color, textural markmaking.

@ David,  thank you for the comments.  If you (or anyone else) have any ways you approach keeping the hard, graphical edges when finishing/polishing pieces I would be most appreciative to hear.  It seems whenever I go through the paint process, adding atmospherics & textural overlays diminishes many of the hard edges I had...even though I make a conscious effort not to use soft-edged brushes.  The only way I have dealt with this is doing an edge pass at the end of polish, but that seems somewhat inefficient and makes the mid-work suffer.  Even then, sometimes the edges are lost to a point of being hard to retrieve without significant time spent.

 

 

flaptraps
#34 Posted : Thursday, April 28, 2011 1:44:32 PM(UTC)
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Hey Marisa! did a quick paintover for you book cover, it's a great start! i pointed out in red some things that stuck out that i feel need to change and also in the blue outline was some great texture stuff that you had that gives it that watercolor look which what ever you were doing there keep doing it:) i mocked up some stuff on the right i thought would help, maybe more variation in shape and also pushing some saturation in spots to give something to focus on, also just a note to look at opportunities for use of small and large pattern shaps like you have in the building in the back, in general all the negative shapes in there are about the same size and it would be a great opportunity to add some variation. Great start though! and i'll make sure to swing by when i stop by the office! cheers.

Richard Anderson
www.flaptrapsart.com
MarisaErven
#35 Posted : Thursday, April 28, 2011 10:29:43 PM(UTC)
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Hey Rich!  Thanks, really appreciate the mock up.  Here is a revis wip of what I was able to get done tonite.  Certainly a new workflow for me.  Still would like to rebalance the noise level some and add the bits for the building/mg.  :)  Oh, & sure thing! Would be fun to see you. Thanks again!

Cheers,

M

David Morgado
#36 Posted : Friday, April 29, 2011 2:05:27 AM(UTC)
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MarisaErven wrote:
If you (or anyone else) have any ways you approach keeping the hard, graphical edges when finishing/polishing pieces I would be most appreciative to hear.
There's lots of ways to go about it: - use the lasso to create a selection before painting - Keep the elements on separate layers, and have them selected before painting inside them (you can soften up parts of the edges with smudge of course) - if you don't want to have selections, you have to be very decisive and controled in your strokes. The reason that probably causes the soft edging, is because you stroke several times in the same place, translucently. So the way to avoid that is by painting more opaquely, and only use 1 or 2 strokes in a edge. That requires a good degree of control of course, but its preferable that you spend 30 seconds thinking of the stroke you need, and then 2 seconds stroking it, than the other way around Hope that helps
MarisaErven
#37 Posted : Monday, May 02, 2011 10:41:34 PM(UTC)
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Hi David,

Thank you so much for this. I had used the lasso but not during the workflow, generally after. Keeping selection sets helped. I did find a workflow was much faster accessing the selection sets through the channels area rather than reloading it through the menu every time which helped a TON with workflow speed.

I really appreciate your feedback/comments. I'm uploading comething in just a moment and hopefully it will be more apparent that I put a variety of those techniques to use.

Cheers,
M
MarisaErven
#38 Posted : Monday, May 02, 2011 10:47:42 PM(UTC)
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3D Render > Paint round one.  I've included the original render below.  Comments always welcome :)

 

 

 

MarisaErven
#39 Posted : Thursday, May 05, 2011 10:28:23 PM(UTC)
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Another 3D based piece.  Original render at bottom.  Would like to additional time articulating foreground elements and right hand side more.  Any comments/crits always welcome.

 

David Morgado
#40 Posted : Friday, May 06, 2011 3:19:17 AM(UTC)
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MarisaErven wrote:
I did find a workflow was much faster accessing the selection sets through the channels area rather than reloading it through the menu every time which helped a TON with workflow speed
Yes indeed, using channels is the way to go, its a much more organic way of getting the selections back. Another good way is using layer masks, which has the added benefit that you can manipulate those masks as needed. Also, remember that masks\selections (they are one and the same), don't need to be completely hard edged. The beauty of them is that you can interact with them as if it was paint. Meaning you can also smudge them etc. Your 3d work is coming along nicely. The only thing I believe you can be more conscious of is the texture overlay: if the texture is too harsh (in the case of the castle), you can see that it looses alot of readability. You can always paint back ing what you lost. But general rule its always easier to soften up what is too hard, rather than the inverse. Hope what helps
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